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Thoughtfulness

 Thoughts and feelings matter to God?

In thoughtful reflection, I set aside some time, and contemplated how a friend may have been feeling. I suddenly wondered, does God ever do what I am doing now? Do our thoughts and feelings matter to God?

What are your feelings?

Growing up as a child and then a young man, I don’t remember many times anybody asking me, “Tom, what do you think about this?” “What are your feelings? I remember only a few occasions of someone sincerely saying to me, “how are you doing?”

Jesus loved him

In the Bible, when Jesus met a rich young ruler, it says that He loved him. Yes, though the man did not grasp Jesus’ message, Jesus loved him. When Peter didn’t understand Jesus’ feet washing ministry, Jesus, nevertheless, took time to identify with Peter’s  bafflement. Then The Lord explained things. Jesus took the side of and defended an adulterer one day,  causing quite a stir.

Another Comforter

I mused about the precious Holy Spirit who came as another Comforter. He brings things to our remembrance, and He aptly teaches. He witnesses with our spirit that we are indeed sons of God and builds in us our identity in Christ. He solidifies our united position with Christ, as He illuminates the scriptures. He makes Calvary and all of it’s healing, redeeming effects, real in my heart and conscience.

He makes Calvary and all of it's healing, redeeming effects, real in my heart and conscience. Click To Tweet

He abides faithful.

I discover that His kindness encourages a changed mind and heart, His gentleness tends toward making me valuable. I find that when my heart condemns me, One greater shows up to set the record straight. I am tutored to know that when I believe not, He abides faithful. Yes, yes He cannot deny Himself. He delights in mercy in Micah 7:18, He waits to be gracious in Isaiah 30:18. His lovingkindness is better than life!

Many abuse the kindness.

So, we hear people say, “many will take advantage” or “many abuse the kindness.” I agree. Jesus spoke to a person and said “neither do I condemn you, go and sin no more.” It was a warning. Later He spoke from off His cross, “Father forgive them, they know not what they do.” Thankfully, Jesus did not withdraw His kindness because of men’s rejection.

What does God think about dying?

When I had a personal tragedy happen in my family, I realized that I must really know for sure how God thinks about this event. What does God think about a person dying? My ability to recover from such a loss, hinged on God’s heart and mind toward me. Is He callous, or does He care? Am I being unreasonable to grieve so; am I being babyish? Do I just need to “grow up?”

He hated death

I discovered the tenderness of a loving Father with a child, the patience and understanding of a compassionate healer. I found He cared, and then He taught me how He hated death and arrived on earth to taste it for every man and so abolish it. He came to take away the sting of it for now, and the fear of it forever. Yes, sin was His target and just as much with this goal is the wage of sin, death.

He taught me how He hated death and arrived on earth to taste it for every man. Click To Tweet

Death died

So, this evil weapon of God’s enemy, causing fear and anxiety, itself met it’s death; yes, death died. Now it has no more dominion over the saint. No more can it ultimately touch us.

God, thoughtful caring Father and Friend

I would conclude to simply say that God cared about me. Without hesitation, I would say in closing that God is a thoughtful, caring, Father and Friend. “Almighty infinite, Father; faithfully loving your own; here in our weakness You found us; falling before Your throne.”

Let God’s considerateness affect you, let Him comfort you, tell Him how you are feeling and find His gentleness. He waits      Love ya

Tom Sliva

Tom Sliva

Born in Pittsburgh Pennsylvania, Pastor Sliva went to Bible college in Massachusetts at the Stevens School of the Bible in !982. He and his family moved to Baltimore in1987 to be a part of Greater Grace World Outreach. From there, he served in Prescott, Arizona, and Indianapolis, Ind. Ordained upon his return to Baltimore in 1995, Pastor Sliva was afflicted with brain cysts in the late 90's and stayed at home base until his recovery in 2002. He then assisted with ministries in Cincinnati and Pittsburgh before resettling in Baltimore due to his son's sudden illness and death. Pastor Sliva is a colon cancer survivor and has been part of Pastoral care team at Greater Grace since 2008. He is also a writer of his blog at http://tsliva.blogspot.com and leader of the Grief Share group.
Tom Sliva

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